How to Set Priorities

To set priorities is crucial, especially if you want to move forward.

Without a plan, it’s easy to get wrapped up in things that don’t really matter or things that aren’t helping you to grow. For me, health is my number one priority. Setting priorities around health helps to keep me focused on it. I align goals to help me achieve optimal health such as exercise, nutrition and trying my best to maintain a well-balanced life.

Setting Priorities Keeps Me in Check.

setting priorities

Health is my #1 Priority

For instance – to keep in line with this priority, I set a goal to exercise five times a week at a minimum. Today was one of my workout days and I didn’t want to work out. I almost gave in to the temptation of not working out, which is an easy thing to do when I’m tired, cranky, and it’s not quite four in the morning (yup – I’m crazy, I know!) Anyway, I thought of my priority and decided right then and there that I would not give up on it. In setting priorities around health, I made a pact with myself to stick to exercise.

So, I did my workout. I was lazy at first, but then, I triumphed! My energy level raised considerably and I not only got through the workout, but I blasted through it. Now, as I set out to start my day, I am energized and feeling accomplished.

Biggest benefit to setting priorities…

When you feel like giving in… a priority can set you back on the right path. I SO easily could’ve caved and tossed myself in front of the television this morning. I came VERY close to doing that. I need reminders. They keep me going. Without them, it’s so easy to wander around aimlessly. I don’t want to waste my time walking with no sense of direction. I LOVE having a plan. I LOVE accomplishing goals towards that plan. I hope you do, too.

Wishing you the very best,
Suzie Carr, novelist

P.S. Your turn to share! I want to hear from you. Is setting priorities something you do, and does it keep you on track?

16 replies
  1. Dianne
    Dianne says:

    What sets me back is my own brain. I think about everything too much, so it’s very easy for me to talk myself out of working out. “I’m too tired” “I deserve a day off” “I’m too busy”, etc. I find that if I can turn my brain off long enough to just get dressed and get started, I’m fine, and I find that some of my best runs end up happening on lazy days. Any tips/tricks you can share would be greatly appreciated!!!

    Reply
    • Suzie Carr
      Suzie Carr says:

      Hi Dianne, You’re not alone, for sure! Working out requires such energy, that it’s one of the easiest things to talk ourselves out of. I’m guilty sometimes of saying, ‘ok, I will take today off and make up for it on my alloted day off’.. only to come to my day off and have something else get in the way. I agree, Dianne, this morning’s workout, despite my lack of energy at the start of it, turned out to be a great one. My trick is I have this mantra taped to many different places in my house… ‘With my health, anything is possible.’ This helps me. It keeps me focused on the reason I’m exercising. And remember, even if we do fall off the wagon of exercise for a day or two… we can get right back on. Just keep taking it one workout at a time… Thanks for chiming in Dianne. I truly appreciate it!

      Reply
  2. Jon M
    Jon M says:

    Great post, Suzie. Setting health as a priority is so essential. I try to do this each week in both exercise and eating.

    When I trained actively for a half marathon, there was magic in having a schedule of what I needed to do each week. Rain, shine, travel or home, I kept to my priorities and always ran. It is the power of priority. More importantly, it is the power of doing thing that make you better!

    Thanks! Jon

    Reply
    • Suzie Carr
      Suzie Carr says:

      Hi Jon, thanks for the comment. Yes, I am a firm believer in making health a major priority in life. With it, anything is possible. I agree, that schedule is a magical motivator, isn’t it? It acts as a primer to action. Accomplishment is such a great feeling! Happy running to you!

      Reply
  3. Suzie Carr
    Suzie Carr says:

    oh yes, a red flag indeed. I never quite looked at it that way, and am glad you pointed it out. I think seeing that red flag wave is a good visual reminder to stay the course.
    Setting those good habits is so critical, isn’t it? Creating a plan that gets you through those 30 days is a sure way to setting this good habit into place. 30 days. That’s it. It’s that simple. Thank you for pointing that out.
    And thank you for the compliments on my doggy:-)

    Reply
  4. Suzie Carr
    Suzie Carr says:

    Hi sis! 🙂 So nice to get a comment from you on here. I credit you for inspiring me to keep fitness my priority. All those years of getting me up at 5 in the morning to go to World Gym have paid off… 🙂 Love ya!

    Reply
  5. Deone Higgs
    Deone Higgs says:

    I wasn’t a great planner in the past, Suzie. However, I’ve gotten a lot better with making it more of a priority. I still see much room for improvements needing to be made, but my joy comes from the improvements I’ve already made thus far.

    One area in specific where I would benefit in setting higher priority in my life, is in writing and completing my book. It has been a very long journey for me. Initially, I thought I would be finish by now, and reaping the rewards of my accomplishments. I had no idea I would still be working on it. It is going on the third year. Nevertheless, I just keep working on it, because I believe it is going to assist many people. The better I get about making it my #1 priority, the closer I will be in reaching the goal of finishing it. 🙂

    Thanks for the inspiration, beloved. It’s always a pleasure reading you. 🙂

    Reply
    • Suzie Carr
      Suzie Carr says:

      Hi Deone, thanks for writing in here… you know, I totally get your priority! Writing is in my top 5 of priorities… Because of this, it gets an action list and only the other priorities on this top 5 list can trump it at any given time. Writing a book is ardous and time-consuming. It’s critical to write out the plan and follow it. Even if that plan indiciates it’ll take you ten years to write the book, then so be it. TIme is not the critical factor here… enjoying the process and making it the best you can is. Does that make sense?

      Reply
  6. know_alak
    know_alak says:

    As far as exercise goes, I am in category of the people which Dianne has described below. But I guess the priority does kick in when with the things we love. I do have a doubt though. Do you plan the whole life or do you plan the plans (not sure if makes any sense 🙂 ). I make plans but try living spontaneously( which is seriously hindered if we have a job) but I still keep my plans on my horizon (always is sight) 🙂 ( I still doubt if I make sense).

    Reply
    • Suzie Carr
      Suzie Carr says:

      HI Alak, I don’t plan everything in my life this way. I like spontaneity, too. In fact, I think some things need to be unplanned to keep life from getting too routine. What I do plan though, are the priorities. I have my top 5. Health is always #1 because without it, where would I be? Right? So, I plan my priorites very carefully. I write out action items according to these priorities so I stay in check with them. Every day, I do something towards my goals. Without a plan, I’d just wander around aimlessly. I like structure and direction, and I think most people would agree with that. What are your thoughts on planning the most crucial and leaving other stuff unplanned?

      Reply
      • know_alak
        know_alak says:

        I guess that is planning the plans 🙂 I do agree with what you’ve mentioned here. Goals and dreams give a sense and purpose to life and existence. I used to plan a lot but during those phases I used to turn into this crazy me who saves every second and invests in those plans. Maybe that’s why I get the hibbie jibbies.

        Reply
        • Suzie Carr
          Suzie Carr says:

          I think it comes down to pinpointing the critical things. I tend to plan too many things. I have learned hard lessons doing this…. Aside from cloning myself, there is no realistic way to achieve an overabundance of goals. So, I’ve learned to cut them down to a manageable number.

          Reply
  7. Alice Chan, Ph.D.
    Alice Chan, Ph.D. says:

    Good for you, Suzie, for sticking with your plan! I was a Type A planner for most of my life, so, yes, I had my priorities alright! Now, while I still have plans, and I know what’s important to me, I have relaxed some on how tightly I hold to those plans, as I’ve learned that sometimes things simply don’t happen in my time frame or exactly how I had planned it, especially if it involves other people. So, I believe it’s still important to know where I want to head, but I’m less rigid about the when and how. Side note: I admire you for exercising 5 times a week or more! I do know that when I don’t feel like exercising, that’s when I most need it. Once I overcome the initial objection, I always, always feel better, like your experience above. Thank you!

    Reply
    • Suzie Carr
      Suzie Carr says:

      Hi Alice! Yeah, I’m a total Type A planner:-) I agree, when it comes to waiting on other people, the whole time plan can get thrown way off. It’s impossible to plan around others. The priorities I plan out strictly are typically only ones I can control. Thanks for chiming in!

      Reply
  8. Lisa Kirby Carter
    Lisa Kirby Carter says:

    I learned a while back for myself that when I don’t set priorities for myself, things go a bit haywire for me. I love your dedication to your health. Kudo’s to you. I love how inspiring and motivating hearing others stories and committment behind getting healthy is. Thanks for sharing.

    Irish at Dedicated 2 Life

    Reply

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